March

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An Around the World Parent/Child Mystery Book Adventure

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March is National Reading Month

Below is a list of resources and websites to help you have a fun time reading as a family in March. 

The National Education Association (NEA) has many great resources when it comes to reading.  They host Read Across America each year.  They have come up with a list of theTop 100 Books for Kids.  This is a great list to have on hand when trying to help your child choose a book to read.  If the local library does not have a book from the list, they can always have it transferred there so you can check it out.

We Give Books is a website that allows you to read books online from your computer.  There is no audio that reads the books to the children, but kids and parents will enjoy reading these popular fiction and non-fiction titles together.  The age range of the books is from 0-10.  You will have to sign up for this service, but it is free to access after that.

Starfall.com opened in September of 2002 as a free public service to teach children to read with phonics. They have a systematic phonics approach that  is perfect for preschool, kindergarten, first grade, second grade, special education, homeschool, and English language development (ELD, ELL, ESL). Starfall is an educational alternative to other entertainment choices for children.  My daughter loved to sing along with the songs and really enjoyed the online activities.

March 2 is Dr. Seuss's birthday.  What better way is there to celebrate reading than to read some fun books by Dr. Seuss.  Children and adults love his play on words with rhyme and nonsense.  His illustrations are equally fun.  Seussville is a educational and entertaining website to visit and celebrate all things Seuss.

Reading is Fundamental has lots of good resources for kids and families.  They have a website dedicated to Reading as a Family ,  Leamons en Familia , a reading for 0-5 year old children site called Leading to Reading which is also in Spanish, and lastly Reading Planet  a site that is for ages 6-15.

Read to Me is a site that has videos of celebrities reading children's books.  There are not a lot books to choose from, but the ones they do have are good.

Lastly, I came across a website called, Kiddie Records Weekly,  that is dedicated to sharing the classic children's story records of the 1940s-1950s with a whole new audience.  These are audio files and show the cover art of the orginal records.  These are great stories and songs tnat you can listen to as a family. You can discuss the pictures that you visualize in your mind as the stories are read.  Also, you could discuss these stories just like you would a book that your child may read.  Talk about the setting or where the story takes place, the characters, the problem that the characters face, important events of the story, andhow was the problem solved in the end.


 

Motivating Kids to Read:

Getting Your Child to Love Reading

 Helping your children enjoy reading is one of the most important things you can do as a parent and it's well worth the investment of your time and energy. 

Kids will learn reading skills in school, but often they come to associate reading with work, not pleasure. As a result, they lose their desire to read. And it is that desire—the curiosity and interest—that is the cornerstone to using reading and related skills successfully. 

By far the most effective way to encourage your children to love books and reading is to read aloud to them, and the earlier you start, the better. Even a baby of a few months can see pictures, listen to your voice, and turn cardboard pages. 

Make this time together a special time when you hold your kids and share the pleasure of a story without the distractions of TV or telephones. You may be surprised to find that a well-written children's book is often as big a delight to you as it is to the kids. 

And don't stop taking the time to read aloud once your children have learned to read for themselves. At this stage, encourage them to read to you some of the time. This shared enjoyment will continue to strengthen your children's interest and appreciation. 

Simply having books, magazines, and newspapers around your home will help children view them as part of daily life. And your example of reading frequently and enjoying it will reinforce that view. 

While your children are still very small, it's a good idea to start a home library for them, even if it's just a shelf or two. Be sure to keep some books for little children to handle freely. 

Include specially made, extra-durable books for infants, and pick paperbacks and plastic covers for kids who are older but still not quite ready for expensive hardbacks. Allowing little children to touch, smell, and even taste books will help them develop strong attachments. 

How you handle books will eventually influence how your kids treat them. Children imitate, so if they see that you enjoy reading and treat books gently and with respect, it is likely that they will do the same. 

When you read aloud together, choose books that you both like. If a book seems dull, put it down and find one that is appealing. There are, however, so many children's books in print that making the best selections may seem a formidable task. 

One approach is to look for award-winning books. There are two famous awards for children's literature made each year by the American Library Association that are good indicators of quality work: the Caldecott Medal for illustration and the Newbery Medal for writing. But these are given to only two of the approximately 2,500 new children's books published each year. 

Fortunately, there is a lot of other good help available. For instance, there are lists of books recommended by the American Library Association and the Library of Congress, as well as some excellent books to guide parents in making selections. 

The best help of all, though, is at your neighborhood library. If you are not familiar with the library, don't hesitate to ask for help. The children's librarian is trained to help you locate specific books, books that are good for reading aloud, and books on a particular subject recommended for a particular age group. 

The library also has many book lists, including ones like those mentioned above and probably some published by the library itself. 

In addition, your library will have several journals that regularly review children's books, including the Horn Book and Booklist. These will give you an idea of what's new and worth pursuing. 

And there's nothing like just browsing through the many books available at your library until you find ones that appeal to you and your kids. 

If your children are school-aged, keep in mind that the school library is an excellent source for a wide variety of materials and the school librarian is knowledgeable about children's literature. Encourage your kids to bring home books from their school library for pleasure as well as for their studies.

Author: Kathryn Perkinson
Source: U.S. Department of Education
The previous article is from Reading is Fundamental (RIF)

 

 

 

Explore. Imagine. Laugh. Share. Create. Learn. Smile. Grow.

Welcome to Wonderopolis®, a place where natural curiosity and imagination lead to exploration and discovery in learners of all ages. Brought to life by the National Center for Families Learning (NCFL), our Wonders of the Day® will help you find learning moments in everyday life—ones that fit in with dinner preparations, carpool responsibilities, a stolen moment between breakfast and the bus, or within school curriculum and education programs.

Wonder is for everyone. It can happen anywhere and at anytime. Connecting the learning we do in our schools, our homes, and our communities, Wonderopolis walks the line between formal and informal education. Each day, we pose an intriguing question and explore it in a variety of ways. Our approach both informs and encourages new questions, sparking new paths of wonder and discovery in family and classroom settings.

- See more at: http://wonderopolis.org/about/#sthash.GbwawlOg.dpuf

 

Explore. Imagine. Laugh. Share. Create. Learn. Smile. Grow.

Welcome to Wonderopolis®, a place where natural curiosity and imagination lead to exploration and discovery in learners of all ages. Brought to life by the National Center for Families Learning (NCFL), our Wonders of the Day® will help you find learning moments in everyday life—ones that fit in with dinner preparations, carpool responsibilities, a stolen moment between breakfast and the bus, or within school curriculum and education programs.

Wonder is for everyone. It can happen anywhere and at anytime. Connecting the learning we do in our schools, our homes, and our communities, Wonderopolis walks the line between formal and informal education. Each day, we pose an intriguing question and explore it in a variety of ways. Our approach both informs and encourages new questions, sparking new paths of wonder and discovery in family and classroom settings.

- See more at: http://wonderopolis.org/about/#sthash.GbwawlOg.dpuf